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The Heart of Charleston

20 11 2012

I’ve been looking through my last few posts and I’ve realized they’re pretty cheesy. Spirit, motion, paths… I wanted to bring this one back down to earth and talk about the “Heart of Charleston.”

Yep, I guess I’m pure cheese.

I put all the pictures up and started to write the blog entry. Then I went through all the pictures a few times and couldn’t put any words to it. I hope the story told by the photos comes through to all of you the same way it does to me. I hope you enjoyed it.

 

 

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The Colors of Charleston

31 10 2012

I recently had the pleasure of visiting the beautiful Charleston, SC. This is a bustling waterfront city in my home state with a fantastic market and tons of little shops scattered around.  Like many modern artisans, the folks selling there goods in the market are super funny about people taking pictures. Frankly, as many of you know, if you’ve got it in public we can snap it, in fact here’s a great article about that, but I don’t like to step on peoples toes so I tell them who I am, a bit about the blog, and they usually let me take a few snaps. Frankly, if they don’t appreciate a little publicity, I’d just as soon not give it to them. :O

I’m staying true to the title and with this first post I’m sharing the most colorful pictures from my visit. I like this shot because despite many of the pieces being similar, the colors help them to contrast each other really well. The background got a bit washed out but because the foreground held up so well and stayed so vivid, I actually like what it adds to the shot.

You all know I like to get low and close. The patterns on the handles of these swords worked really well for this shot.

A classic bed and breakfast on meeting street. Less color than the trinkets but a pink building downtown deserves a photo.

The wire keeping this sign from being stolen really makes this one. It’s simple but the sign really has a lot of character. I’m learning that for the sake of photography, my taste finds that most subjects get better with age.

I love the hand painted items in the market. There’s something special about walking through tables full of things not made in factories but on front porches instead.

I hate to send you off to wikipedia instead of another blog but here’s a link you should click. These glasses depict an actual place in Charleston called “Rainbow Row.” Here’s an excerpt from wiki: “After the Civil War, this area of Charleston devolved into near slum conditions. In the early 1900s, Dorothy Porcher Legge purchased a section of these houses numbering 99 through 101 East Bay and began to renovate them. She chose to paint these houses pink based on a colonial Caribbean color scheme. Other owners and future owners followed suit, creating the “rainbow” of pastel colors present today. The coloring of the houses helped keep the houses cool inside as well as give the area its name.”

The final shot and one of my favorites from the day is this beautiful spread of scarves. After years of shooting complex shots and intricate arrangements I’m still amazed by how simplicity masters every art form.

I shared today’s post of an ocean front town on purpose. Many people have faced hardship in recent days thanks to mother nature. If you would like to donate to help Hurricane Sandy victims, here’s the Red Cross relief page.

Thanks for visiting and reading the blog. I’ve missed our regular interactions but life has been pulling me in every direction lately. Have a wonderful week and God Bless!





Born in The South, Raised in a Glass

1 06 2012

If you’re from the south like I am, than you know the title of this post is talking about that “Singular Soft Drink of the South,” the ever alliterative, Cheerwine. Before you ask, no this is not a sponsored post, but if the fine folks over at Cheerwine want to send me a case, I’d be more than happy to accept :). I’m sure you’re wondering by now if I’ll ever get to the point so I won’t keep you waiting any longer. Amid my journeys through the rural roads of South Carolina, I came upon a closed up shop, with a Cheerwine vending machine.

I had already passed the store but I doubled back to take a few shots. I would miss a lot of pictures if I didn’t make my mind up a long time ago to double back often. Anything that catches your eye is worth a u-turn and a few extra minutes. Normally I get frustrated with power lines in my pictures. They look tacky in the background of portraits or churches and especially sunsets, but in a shot like this they actually compliment the image. The difference is they tell a story. They become part of a bigger story of a little general store that needed electricity for their Cheerwine machine and their energy efficient light-bulbs. 🙂

The toughest decision here was if I wanted the white post in my foreground. The argument here is that it takes away from the subject, (the drink machine), but adds to the atmosphere of the old store. I left it. Sometimes a little distraction from a dominant subject will force your viewer to take in the whole image instead of just a key feature of it.

Hope you enjoyed today’s short post. I also hope the past few days I have managed to build a bit of anticipation for the old cars series, I’m very excited about sharing them, mostly because I’ve only had a few chances to shoot old cars and they’re a lot of fun. Thanks for visiting, as always I love reading and responding to your comments. If you would like to share anything you see here you are welcome to do so, please mention shootabout if you do though. Happy Friday! God Bless!

P.S. If you want to let Cheerwine know you heard about them on shootabout, you can do it here and make my day 🙂 there’s also a link at the top of that page where you can order some Cheerwine, it’s delicious 🙂





Counterculture, Flowers, and Chimneys

31 05 2012

Today I’m in the process of wrapping up the last pictures from my shoot last week so I can get into a series on old cars I’ve been working on. I suppose since this post is a little scattered anyways, I’ll slip in some life stuff here and there while I’m writing.

I almost missed this shot entirely, twice. I was driving down a back road on my way to another location when I saw an old dilapidated building with a chimney, see below. I took a few shots of it that didn’t get me too excited and was about to walk back to my car when these flowers in front of this old white store front caught my eye. I played around with a few angles and aperture settings until I finally got this. I couldn’t be happier.

When I took this shot I wanted something dark and back-lit. I considered going for a silhouette but the trees in the background would have made the building almost indistinguishable. I get a little chuckle from a shot like this because it makes me think about how our society has changed. When this house was built, the chimney and the fireplace inside may have been a source of warmth, or used for cooking. Now fireplaces are considered a luxury item. I also think of hunting and fishing, it was once an essential part of our survival but now they’re used as a source of relaxation, an escape from our busy lives. I wonder if we’re really progressing or just getting away from a lifestyle we constantly try to recreate.

I just realized the past few posts have featured a lot of old things. Old buildings, tools, places. Part of that is a product of where I live. My small town surroundings don’t offer a lot of bustling metropolitan environments for me to spend my time shooting in. David made a comment on my last post that a lot of modern buildings are soulless. I’m a huge fan of modern and old architecture and I agree with him to an extent. I think we live in a world where people want to fit in, and that has even influenced architecture. Anything that is unique is though of as counter-culture. Entire movements have started to fight “conformity.” Most of the people in those movements don’t realize they’re fighting for society to take a step back into the past. Would that be bad or good though?

I don’t want to get too wordy here so I’ll go ahead and wrap it up here. Hopefully my observations have got some wheels turning and I’ll get some buzz in the comments below. Naturally I’d love to hear your feedback on the images too. I have one more post before I get to the old car series so stay tuned this weekend!

Check out Facebook and Twitter, follow the blog, feel free to reblog or use anything here provided you mention where you got it. Have a great day and God Bless! -Arley





Buildings are People Too

31 05 2012

I absolutely love old buildings. I could spend hours taking pictures of barns and old warehouses, closed manufacturing facilities. The inherent risk of going inside them is both thrilling and often illegal so always check first. Unfortunately I couldn’t get approval to go inside anything for this shoot but I got some really great stuff around this old place.

I’m not exactly sure what one would call this. It feels a bit like a barn but without the big barn doors and livestock stalls inside I suppose it was just an old storage building. I framed the sun right on the edge of the roof to get the little star-burst you see here. If you look on the right side of the picture, you can actually see the tree from yesterdays post. 🙂 One of the really interesting aspects of this building is the foliage growing up the sides. I decided to get a closer look.

Frankly this is all a little too dead for me. The mood of this image is really dark and gloomy. A sprinkle of light could have made those dark vines interesting but I just find them a little depressing here. It’s not usually a mood I go for on shootabout but it’s good to know how to create a discouraging image. When you’re taking a photograph, you want to capture the essence of your subject. This old building is well out of its glory years and is now no more than a crumbling tribute to its former purpose. When you think about it that way, I guess this picture does the job.

This shot was my favorite of the set. In contrast to the previous image, the ivy growing on the building gives it a since of life but still respects its age. You don’t lose the ancient feeling but the subject is so filled with life it begins to feel more like an old friend than a decrepit stranger. I suppose the most interesting part of this shot is that I feel so comfortable personifying it. Once you start to think of a structure as having character and personality, you know you’ve done it some justice in your photograph.

Thanks for stopping by today. I always enjoy hearing from you in the comments below. If you’re a first time visitor I would love to have you join the circle of friends following my blog. My favorite part about the blog is when I submit a post and immediately wonder “What will Rich or Dezra or Victoria or Mary Lou or Andra say.” (Those are my top commentors and all fantastic bloggers that you should check out 🙂 )

Anyways, thanks for stopping by! Everything you see here is the intellectual property of Arley Hendrick. Copying anything in whole or part is strictly encouraged provided you mention the blog with a link when you do it. 🙂 Have a great day and God Bless!





Hubcaps For Sale

27 05 2012

Maybe an obscure title like that will finally make me show up on the freshly pressed radar. 🙂 I’m very tired and a box of hub caps happened to be in the first picture so it is mildly relevant. I’m trying something I have tried only on one other occasion, I am writing a post at 1AM and scheduling it to appear on the blog at a reasonable hour of the morning so it can greet you when you’re bright and ready for a new day instead of looking at cat pictures trying to fall asleep. This is from my shoot Friday which included the 3 crosses pictures.

I had to take a few pictures to get this shot the way I wanted. I have been cheating a bit lately. I have left my ISO set on auto so that I can do what I want with the f/stop and shutter speed then let the camera do the hard work. Fortunately, I haven’t lost my touch so the second frame here came out the way I wanted. The camera got a bit confused with the extreme lights and darks so I had to take over. I’ve said it once, I’ll say it again, the camera is very smart but it’s not particularly creative. If f/stop, shutter speed, and ISO are Greek to you, I have an excellent (if I do say so myself) blog post about it here.

This image is intentionally very dark. I didn’t want a lot of detail. I got just enough pattern from the table to make it interesting but this shot was a lot more about mood than content. It’s kind of similar to when you hear a song you like but you have no idea what it’s about. It’s fun to do this once in a while with your photographs; I think it makes the picture say a little less about your subject and a little more about yourself and your creative direction.

Of course it only took me a flat second to decide the detail here is so great, I wanted to take another shot to capture it. The great thing about old/rustic buildings is the imperfections. I love the visible knots in the wood. I wish more things today looked a little more like this and a little less like something off an assembly line. Functional but full of character.

I have a bit of a thing for doors. Especially if they’re barred up and locked. Even more so if the metal is rusty and the paint is peeling. The textures come together really nicely here and the brick pattern in the background does a lot to make this shot feel more structured. By that I mean a consistent pattern, whether subject or supporting element, makes a picture feel more organized and less random.

My favorite thing about using a shallow DoF (Depth of Field) is you can take something very plain, like this concrete barrier thing, and focus on the most interesting part of it to make the whole thing far more appealing than it would be if you could see all the boring details clearly. You’re mind kind of just assumes the whole thing is as cool as this little bit you see clearly.

Well, I’ve reached the point that I know I should wrap this up before I get an sleepier and say something dumb/goofy. I hope you enjoyed the pictures/narrative. Let me know what you think down south in the comments section. Social links for Facebook and Twitter are up north. If you aren’t following the blog you could miss out on new stuff so be sure to do that while you’re here if you enjoy what I’m sharing. I love getting mentioned. That notification that someone mentioned me in a blog post makes my whole day, I love it when you tell your friends about me.

Anyways, that’s it. I’m signing off. Have a great Memorial Day weekend if you’re in the US. To all my other amazing friends scattered across the globe, have a great Sunday. God Bless -Arley





Three Pictures of Three Crosses

25 05 2012

I have had a pretty exciting day. I just got done with about 3 hours of shooting and I’ve got a lot of great stuff you’ll be seeing for the next few days. Another cause for excitement is I am getting very close to the 20,000 view mark thanks to all of you. I’m hoping the next 1100 or so views I need will come in over the weekend and I’ll get to celebrate with a special post. For tonight, I want to share a few pictures from the first location I shot at today.

This wasn’t my first picture. I wanted to share this one first though because this one made a nice overview shot. The crosses aren’t the focus here, instead they are just a supporting element. The front wall is the focus here, you’ll find out something funny about that wall shortly.

Here’s the funny thing. I hopped up on that wall for this picture. The cars passing behind me got a big kick out of the show I was putting on. This shot is one I think of as a 50/50 shot. About half the picture is the subject and the foreground and the other half is the sky. When I’m working with a wide angle lens, I like to catch a lot of the sky in it every now and then. This picture does break one of my rules (I always try to break at least one any given day) it doesn’t have a hero. The great thing about wide angle lenses is they can get away with this. When you get a lot of sky and a vibrant foreground, you can let the overall image be the hero.

For the final shot I got in closer and framed up the closest cross in about the center of the frame. I liked this shot but I still wanted a little more, that’s why I went from here and shot for another two and a half hours.

I hope you enjoyed the blog today. I always love to hear from you in the comments section below. Another exciting announcement is that I got my 1000th email subscriber today. If you haven’t already, I would love for you to subscribe. Of course you can check me out on Facebook and Twitter. If you’re interested in writing a guest post or if you would like me to write something for your blog or website shoot an email to arleyseth@gmail.com.

Thanks again for visiting! Have a great weekend and God Bless!